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Posts by Michael R

EXCLUSIVE: Terror attack on ‪#‎Aventura‬ Turnberry Jewish Center thwarted by FBI.

FYI

EXCLUSIVE: Terror attack on ‪#‎Aventura‬ Turnberry Jewish Center thwarted by FBI.

https://www.facebook.com/7NewsMiami/videos/10153650160587613/

EXCLUSIVE: Terror attack on ‪#‎Aventura‬ Turnberry Jewish Center thwarted by FBI.

FYI

EXCLUSIVE: Terror attack on ‪#‎Aventura‬ Turnberry Jewish Center thwarted by FBI.

https://www.facebook.com/7NewsMiami/videos/10153650160587613/

The Miami Dade County Continues To Put Hurdles In The Way Of Our Having A Safer Community. in North Miami Beach

The Miami Dade County Continues To Put Hurdles In The Way Of Our Having A Safer Community. But With Your Help By Way Of An Email To Certain Community Leaders, We Can Have A Safer Community.

It is a given that the police cannot be everywhere and there are insufficient funds to provide the level of policing we would all like. Therefore, we need to have in place boundaries and other infrastructure that help to reduce crime and to assist police in catching criminals. As criminals are caught easier in our community than elsewhere, many will decide our community is not a crime friendly environment and go elsewhere.

One significant way to make dent in crime is to do what is done in major cities around the world, that is placing sophisticated surveillance cameras throughout the community capable of capturing tags, faces and situations 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. London is an example of a city that has taken advantage of technology for a long time. Miami-Dade County lags behind London and many major cities even cities much smaller. Several years ago I received a call from the major in charge of information technology and communications for the police department. He was responding to an email I had written to the police department regarding the use of cameras in fighting crime. He explained to me that the police department had badly misjudged the value of cameras in fighting crime and as a result was at least 5 years behind where it should be. He said the police department would benefit greatly from facilities and communities with cameras in place that would allow the police department to login even as they are in route to a response. Yet today, the County does nothing to allow camera systems to be available on a large scale basis through Special Taxing Districts.

Purchasing cameras on a block by block basis or a home by home basis would work, but the cost per person buying the cameras has put this idea on the back burner. If we had a $100,000 matching funds program, we would likely be able to find enough neighbors to join together to put up the other half of the funds for their block and we would be able to get at least 15 poles with cameras in place. But getting matching funds from police forfeiture funds proved to be a dead end and no other source for matching funds has been found.

Cameras purchased privately would cost the least but since that is not an immediate option, I had been working on the mechanics of converting the Roving Patrol District into a Camera District. By November or 2014, I finally got the great news, the head of the special taxing district who had turned down my proposal for over a year agreed to raise it with the assistant county attorney and to his surprise, he was told the project was doable with the passing of an ordinance from the Miami-Dade County commission.

Success is not a straight path particularly when dealing with the government. Within days after the good news, came the news that the director of the Special Taxing District was forced to resign. A new assistant was not familiar with the progress that was made and I needed to start all over. Even with continual change in personnel, this time each new assistant was up to speed and agreed it could be done. In preparation for writing the proposal, I met with two national companies that have designed systems such as we are requesting. One in New York and one in Florida. Representatives met with me while they were in town for other projects.

Everything looked great and the Special Taxing District suggested I meet with them and the department in the County that would bid out the project and that is involved in the specification on cameras and technology for the County. They even suggested that I provide an outline of the questions I would have so the meeting would be most effective. I complied and was happy too since I wanted to get a better understanding of what the County will charge for its involvement in the project and the costs of specific components since the program would be run through them. With that information, I would be able to submit a proposal to the community and have a meaningful estimate on total costs, time frame and cost per person.

At 2:43 today, Wednesday, February 24, 2016, I received a call from Mike Bauman, the head of the Special Taxing District and as assistant in the office, Sue Torano, to inform me that the meeting for 4:00 PM tomorrow needed to be cancelled. Mr. Bauman indicated that the Special Taxing District is now under a new department of the County and it is no longer a given that a camera district will be permitted. The concern is privacy in the streets. The cameras will cover sidewalk to sidewalk and make our community safer. The lack of cameras is an advantage for the criminals.

I believe that the boy charged with killing Rabbi Raksin was caught on camera. The 4 boys that committed the car-jacking on 175th Street between 9th and 10th Avenue a few weeks ago were caught on a poor quality camera which provided some benefit. Last week a neighbor was riding his bike on 10th Avenue and the intersection of 173rd Street was hit by a car and the question of whether the driver stopped at the stop sign became an issue. My camera 400’ away captured the incident and when zoomed in, it became clear, the driver did not stop. If we put cameras throughout the community, we will empower police to catch criminals like never before and many criminals will go elsewhere since our neighborhood will not be crime friendly.

Even if everything costs much more by going through the government and there are extra layers of supervision, we can cover a large portion of the community for less than $400 per person per year. My best estimation without the government answering my questions is that we can install 15 poles within the current Special Taxing district (in place of the roving patrol) with an average of 3 license tag cameras per poll capable of capturing almost every tags of every car that pass by the poll, day or night with near perfect readability. There would also be an average of 3 cameras per poll that would capture faces with near perfect recognition within a specific distance and for several hundred feet, capture the situation.

After paying $400 for an estimated 3 years, the infrastructure should be paid for and then the cost of maintenance, cellular service, insurance, etc. would result in a much lower cost. If the County adds even more fat than one could image, it will still be doable but the cost would not go below $400 per year for yet another year. The project is not only doable; it is placing our community at greater risk of crime than necessary by not doing it.

Once we succeed in getting the cameras in the first district, the goal would be to create additional districts until the entire neighborhood is walk-able with cameras. Any area where the majority of the neighbors do not vote for cameras, would not have cameras.

At this point, we need to impress upon our commissions that we deserve to have the right to vote to make our community safer by voting in cameras. If the great majority vote for cameras than the will of the people has spoken and should be respected, our safety depends upon it.

Please write an email, even a short one expressing your support for being able to vote on creating a special taxing district for cameras in our community. If you live within the district with the roving patrol, request that we be permitted to vote to convert it to a district for cameras. If you can explain your concern for crime in our community so much the better.

Please ask everyone in your home to write that has an email address. With enough emails, we will get their attention

Letters should be emailed to:

Commissioner Sally A. Heyman district4@miamidade.gov Chairman Jean Monestime, Board of County Commissioners district2@miamidade.gov

And copy:

Mayor Carlos A. Gimenez JB3@miamidade.gov Michael Ruiz, Director of Parks, Recreation and Open Spaces Department Michael.Ruiz@miamidade.gov Mike Bauman, Division Director, Special Taxing District Program Mike.Bauman@miamidade.gov Alan Sakowitz asakowitz@pointecompanies.com

Thank you and together we are making a difference.

The Miami Dade County Continues To Put Hurdles In The Way Of Our Having A Safer Community. But With Your Help By Way Of An Email To Certain Community Leaders, We Can Have A Safer Community.

The Miami Dade County Continues To Put Hurdles In The Way Of Our Having A Safer Community. But With Your Help By Way Of An Email To Certain Community Leaders, We Can Have A Safer Community.

It is a given that the police cannot be everywhere and there are insufficient funds to provide the level of policing we would all like. Therefore, we need to have in place boundaries and other infrastructure that help to reduce crime and to assist police in catching criminals. As criminals are caught easier in our community than elsewhere, many will decide our community is not a crime friendly environment and go elsewhere.

One significant way to make dent in crime is to do what is done in major cities around the world, that is placing sophisticated surveillance cameras throughout the community capable of capturing tags, faces and situations 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. London is an example of a city that has taken advantage of technology for a long time. Miami-Dade County lags behind London and many major cities even cities much smaller. Several years ago I received a call from the major in charge of information technology and communications for the police department. He was responding to an email I had written to the police department regarding the use of cameras in fighting crime. He explained to me that the police department had badly misjudged the value of cameras in fighting crime and as a result was at least 5 years behind where it should be. He said the police department would benefit greatly from facilities and communities with cameras in place that would allow the police department to login even as they are in route to a response. Yet today, the County does nothing to allow camera systems to be available on a large scale basis through Special Taxing Districts.

Purchasing cameras on a block by block basis or a home by home basis would work, but the cost per person buying the cameras has put this idea on the back burner. If we had a $100,000 matching funds program, we would likely be able to find enough neighbors to join together to put up the other half of the funds for their block and we would be able to get at least 15 poles with cameras in place. But getting matching funds from police forfeiture funds proved to be a dead end and no other source for matching funds has been found.

Cameras purchased privately would cost the least but since that is not an immediate option, I had been working on the mechanics of converting the Roving Patrol District into a Camera District. By November or 2014, I finally got the great news, the head of the special taxing district who had turned down my proposal for over a year agreed to raise it with the assistant county attorney and to his surprise, he was told the project was doable with the passing of an ordinance from the Miami-Dade County commission.

Success is not a straight path particularly when dealing with the government. Within days after the good news, came the news that the director of the Special Taxing District was forced to resign. A new assistant was not familiar with the progress that was made and I needed to start all over. Even with continual change in personnel, this time each new assistant was up to speed and agreed it could be done. In preparation for writing the proposal, I met with two national companies that have designed systems such as we are requesting. One in New York and one in Florida. Representatives met with me while they were in town for other projects.

Everything looked great and the Special Taxing District suggested I meet with them and the department in the County that would bid out the project and that is involved in the specification on cameras and technology for the County. They even suggested that I provide an outline of the questions I would have so the meeting would be most effective. I complied and was happy too since I wanted to get a better understanding of what the County will charge for its involvement in the project and the costs of specific components since the program would be run through them. With that information, I would be able to submit a proposal to the community and have a meaningful estimate on total costs, time frame and cost per person.

At 2:43 today, Wednesday, February 24, 2016, I received a call from Mike Bauman, the head of the Special Taxing District and as assistant in the office, Sue Torano, to inform me that the meeting for 4:00 PM tomorrow needed to be cancelled. Mr. Bauman indicated that the Special Taxing District is now under a new department of the County and it is no longer a given that a camera district will be permitted. The concern is privacy in the streets. The cameras will cover sidewalk to sidewalk and make our community safer. The lack of cameras is an advantage for the criminals.

I believe that the boy charged with killing Rabbi Raksin was caught on camera. The 4 boys that committed the car-jacking on 175th Street between 9th and 10th Avenue a few weeks ago were caught on a poor quality camera which provided some benefit. Last week a neighbor was riding his bike on 10th Avenue and the intersection of 173rd Street was hit by a car and the question of whether the driver stopped at the stop sign became an issue. My camera 400’ away captured the incident and when zoomed in, it became clear, the driver did not stop. If we put cameras throughout the community, we will empower police to catch criminals like never before and many criminals will go elsewhere since our neighborhood will not be crime friendly.

Even if everything costs much more by going through the government and there are extra layers of supervision, we can cover a large portion of the community for less than $400 per person per year. My best estimation without the government answering my questions is that we can install 15 poles within the current Special Taxing district (in place of the roving patrol) with an average of 3 license tag cameras per poll capable of capturing almost every tags of every car that pass by the poll, day or night with near perfect readability. There would also be an average of 3 cameras per poll that would capture faces with near perfect recognition within a specific distance and for several hundred feet, capture the situation.

After paying $400 for an estimated 3 years, the infrastructure should be paid for and then the cost of maintenance, cellular service, insurance, etc. would result in a much lower cost. If the County adds even more fat than one could image, it will still be doable but the cost would not go below $400 per year for yet another year. The project is not only doable; it is placing our community at greater risk of crime than necessary by not doing it.

Once we succeed in getting the cameras in the first district, the goal would be to create additional districts until the entire neighborhood is walk-able with cameras. Any area where the majority of the neighbors do not vote for cameras, would not have cameras.

At this point, we need to impress upon our commissions that we deserve to have the right to vote to make our community safer by voting in cameras. If the great majority vote for cameras than the will of the people has spoken and should be respected, our safety depends upon it.

Please write an email, even a short one expressing your support for being able to vote on creating a special taxing district for cameras in our community. If you live within the district with the roving patrol, request that we be permitted to vote to convert it to a district for cameras. If you can explain your concern for crime in our community so much the better.

Please ask everyone in your home to write that has an email address. With enough emails, we will get their attention

Letters should be emailed to:

Commissioner Sally A. Heyman district4@miamidade.gov Chairman Jean Monestime, Board of County Commissioners district2@miamidade.gov

And copy:

Mayor Carlos A. Gimenez JB3@miamidade.gov Michael Ruiz, Director of Parks, Recreation and Open Spaces Department Michael.Ruiz@miamidade.gov Mike Bauman, Division Director, Special Taxing District Program Mike.Bauman@miamidade.gov Alan Sakowitz asakowitz@pointecompanies.com

Thank you and together we are making a difference.

A MUST SEE FILM Polish Holocaust drama 'Run Boy Run' is a powerful tale of survival

LAST NIGHT TONIGHT THursday 15m 2015 7:15

A MUST SEE FILM:

Polish Holocaust drama Run Boy Run is a powerful tale of survival:

I was moved to Tears. A Lesson For All Of Us !

{ For Those In South FL. The last showing at Cinema Paradiso - Hollywood Address: 503 SE 6th St, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33301 Phone:(954) 525-3456 }

Trailer

http://viewpure.com/h2glYxp4jw0

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=njjdP3gZ_pk