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JBS HIghlights starting 9/20

Watch JBS on Atlantic Broadband Ch168, Hotwire Ch269, Fios Ch798, DirecTV Ch388, Blue Stream Ch 110, streamed on Roku under "educational", Apple TV, Fire TV and jbstv.org. For a complete and timely schedule and other television providers, go to www.jbstv.org

Highlights:

Riskin & Greenberg on the Pandemic

Rabbi Irving “Yitz” Greenberg and Rabbi Shlomo Riskin offer interpretations of the global pandemic and offer suggestions on how to respond to this crisis in a Jewish Way. By Center for Community Education & Bi-Cultural Hebrew Academy of CT. Monday - 8pm & 1am;Wednesday - 2pm; Saturday - 7pm

In The News: MK Tehila Friedman

Blue and White Knesset Member Tehila Friedan speaks about her moving maiden speech on the floor of the Knesset calling for an alliance of moderates to help heal the fractures within Israeli Society. In The News with Shahar Azani. Tuesday - 7pm & 2am; Thursday - 1pm

Threats From North of Israel

A discussion of the threats on Israel’s northern border posed by Iranian funded Hezbollah and a Russian hegemony in Syria. With Gen. Nitzan Nuriel (IDF), Lt. Col. Sarit Zehavi (IDF) and Prof. Boaz Ganor (ICT). With Becky Strapp at AIPAC 2020. Tuesday - 8pm & 1am; Thursday - 2pm; Saturday - 8pm

Robert Siegel: Civil Discourse

Journalist Robert Siegel (former host of NPR’s “All Things Considered”) discusses threats to civil discourse in America with David Brooks (NYT), Sen. Jeanne Shaheen (D-NH) and Yael Eisenstat (Cornell Tech). By American Friends of Rabin Medical Center. Wednesday – 8pm & 2am; Friday – 2pm

Talmud: Why Fast

Rabbi Mordechai Becher explains the concept of "fasting" in the Jewish tradition. Tuesday - 9am & 4:30pm; Thursday - 7pm & 2am

Repentance

The rabbinic view of "Repentance and Free Will," as discussed by Maimonides in his commentary to Pirkey Avot (Ethics of the Fathers) Tuesday – 9:30am & 5pm; Thursday – 7:30pm & 2:30am

Jewish 101: Threefold Blessing

Learn more of the rabbis interpretation of the Creation Story and see how the threefold blessing given to human beings in Chapter 1 of the Book of Genesis suggests a role most people don't normally imagine. "Jewish 101" is hosted by Rabbi Mark S. Golub. Monday - 5am; Wednesday - 9am & 4:30pm; Friday - 1pm

On L'Chayim

Donniel Hartman

Rabbi Donniel Hartman, President of the Shalom Hartman Institute in Jerusalem, discusses the strengths and weakness of Judaism and his notion of an imperfect God as presented in his book “Putting God Second.” Monday – 3pm

Rabbi Robert Wolkoff on God

Conservative Rabbi Robert Wolkoff of Congregation B’nai Tikvah of North Brunswick, NJ explains why he is sure of the existence of God, and discusses his understanding of how God impacts the world. Monday - 9pm & 2am; Tuesday - 3pm

Shai Held - Pt 2

Shai Held, Founding President, Dean and Chair in Jewish Thought of Hadar Institute, talks theology, his understanding of God and his approach to teaching the Jewish Tradition in part two of a conversation.
Tuesday - 9pm & Midnight; Wednesday - 3pm

Rabbis Discuss God & Yom Kippur

Rabbis from different movements of Judaism share their views on the reality of God for the observance of Yom Kippur. With rabbis Mitchell Wohl (Orthodox), Rachel Ain (Conservative) and Steve Gutow (Reconstructionist).
Wednesday - 9pm & Midnight; Thursday - 3pm

Ken Spiro On God

Ken Spiro, rabbi, historian, author and senior lecturer and researcher for Aish HaTorah, explores the Jewish understanding of God. Thursday - 9pm & Midnight; Friday - 3pm

One's Jewish Legacy

Daniel Cohen, senior rabbi of Congregation Agudath Sholom in Stamford, talks about a moment in all of our lives when we experience a wake-up call. Saturday - 6pm

Also:

92nd Street Y: Harold Kushner, Psalm 23

Rabbi Harold S. Kushner, author of "When Bad Things Happen To Good People," delivers a moving and inspiring commentary to Psalm 23, "The Lord Is My Shepherd." An exclusive JBS presentation taped before a live audience at New York's 92nd Street Y. Sunday – 8pm & 2am; Monday - 10pm; Tuesday - 4am; Wednesday - 10:30am; Saturday - 1am & 4pm

In The News: UAE-Israel Agreement

Major General Eitan Dangot, former Head of Government Activities on the West Bank, discusses the UAE-Israel peace agreement ceremony, relevant issues with the Palestinians, and potential other peace agreements. With Shahar Azani. Sunday - 6:30pm & 11:30pm; Monday - 3:30am, 8:30am & 12:30pm

Friday Night

Reform: Central Synagogue Erev Shabbat Services - 6pm & 11:15pm

Orthodox: Hampton Synagogue Kabbalat Shabbat – 7:15 & 10:30pm

Shabbat Morning

Reform: Central Synagogue Shabbat Morning Services - 9:30am & 1pm

Orthodox: Hampton Synagogue Shabbat Morning Services – 11:Am & 2:30 pm

Edith Samers Vice President 203.536.6914 (cell phone) JBS Jewish Broadcasting Service, a 501c3 fulltime television channel Website: jbstv.org

Levi Yitzchok Senior Academy

ATTN Retirees: Join A Jewish Academic Program and Receive a Stipend!

United Jewish Generations, a Chabad organization, is offering retirees a daily Jewish academic learning program, with a stipend! But that’s not all, computer training, computers, internet service and tech support will also be provided for those that need. Using Zoom technology, the senior population will enjoy a powerful learning, friendship, community and intellectual stimulation. Retirees can choose between a one hour/day track and a two hours/day track. Classes will be geared for beginners to intermediate level of Judaic knowledge. Program will include collaborative learning and essay writing.

“This is a perfect solution for the current state of isolation that seniors particularly are suffering from,” says Rabbi Smith, director of United Jewish Generations. “This innovative program will be called ‘Levi Yitzchok Senior Academy’ and will reach those that are ambitious to advance their wisdom with Judaic courses that are both intellectual and inspirational. Everyone should have the opportunity to know their history and heritage.”

The Levi Yitzchok Senior Academy is currently accepting applications for all US residents. If you would like to participate, do not delay, space is limited. For applications and more information click here

United Jewish Generations is a non-profit organization in South Florida that specializes in servicing the senior citizen population. This Academy is one of their many programs that enhance the quality of life for older adults.

For more information, please call Rabbi Menachem Smith at (305) 770-4540 or email rabbi@unitedJewishgenerations.com

JBS Highlights starting 8/30: On JBS: Yossi Klein Halevi, Col. Richard Kemp, Muslim Zionist, and a Week of Entertainers on L'Chayim

Watch JBS on Atlantic Broadband Ch168, Hotwire Ch269, Fios Ch798, DirecTV Ch388, Blue Stream Ch 110, streamed on Roku under "educational", Apple TV, Fire TV and jbstv.org. For a complete and timely schedule and other television providers, go to www.jbstv.org

Halevi: Israel and the Pandemic Author Yossi Klein Halevi discusses the state of Israel during COVID-19, predicting that the pandemic may force a reckoning with two of its most persistent problems — the integration of the Arab Israeli minority and the Haredim. A program of Tribe Tel Aviv. Monday – 7:30pm & 1:30am; Wednesday – 1:30pm; Saturday – 8:30pm

Colonel Kemp on Israel Today Decorated British soldier Colonel Richard Kemp assesses the global threats facing Israel and the West in a MirYam Institute conversation with Co-Founder and CEO Benjamin Anthony. Monday - 8pm & 2am; Wednesday - 2pm; Saturday – 7:30pm

Hafeez: From Islam to Zionism Kasim Hafeez, (Middle East Advisor, Christians United for Israel), describes his journey from radical Islam to becoming an ardent Zionist and supporter of Israel. A program of Dov Hikind’s organization Americans Against Zionism (AAS). Tuesday - 8pm & 2am; Thursday - 2pm

Talmud: Blessings Rabbi Mordechai Becher discusses the history and nuances of Jewish blessings, their Hebrew translations, etymology, and deeper meanings as reminders to appreciate and value everything we use, see, and encounter within our daily lives. On Dimensions of the Daf. Sunday - 9am; Monday - 4am; Tuesday - 9am & 4:30pm; Thursday - 7pm & 2am

Jewish 101: Creation Pt 1 Explore the values of Torah through the rabbinic midrash (interpretation) to The Story of Creation (Genesis Chapter 1), and learn why the Jewish tradition does not read the story literally. Wednesday - 9am & 4:30pm; Friday - 1pm

Shlomo Riskin Shlomo Riskin, Chief Rabbi of Efrat and founder of Ohr Torah Stone, describes the influence upon him of Rav Soloveitchik (z”l) and the Lubavitcher Rebbe (z”l), and discusses his disagreements with today’s Chief Rabbinate of Israel. Sunday - 12 Noon

Joseph Telushkin Rabbi, lecturer and best-selling author Joseph Telushkin discusses the Jewish Tradition through the lens of his book Words That Hurt, Words That Heal.
Sunday – 6pm

Fauda Star Lior Raz The co-creator and star of the hit Israeli series on Netflix, Fauda, discusses how the action series draws a sharp distinction between Palestinian violence and the Israeli response while portraying the humanity of both societies. Monday - 9pm & 2am; Tuesday - 3pm

Evan Hansen Composer Benj Pasek, award-winning composer of Dear Evan Hansen and La La Land, talks about his Jewish background, his collaboration with songwriter Justin Paul, and what he strives to achieve through his music. Tuesday - 9pm & Midnight; Wednesday - 3pm

David Simon David Simon, the creator, writer and producer of the groundbreaking hit television series “The Wire,” and the series adaptation of Philip Roth’s (z”l) counter-factual novel The Plot Against America, shares his concerns about America and Israel.
Wednesday - 9pm & Midnight; Thursday - 3pm

Cast of Shtisel Three stars of the hit Israeli series Shtisel -- Michael Aloni (Kive), Dov Glickman (Shulem) and Neta Riskin (Giti) -- speak about their Jewish backgrounds and how playing Chasidic Jews may have changed their Jewish identities. Thursday - 9pm & Midnight; Friday - 3pm

Stars of "Marvelous Mrs. Maisel" Conversations with cast members from Amy Sherman-Palladino's hit Amazon series “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel,” including Rachel Brosnaham (Marvelous Mrs. Maisel), Alex Borstein (Susie), Michael Zegen (Joel) and Marin Hinkle (Rose). Saturday - 6pm

92nd Street Y: Mel Brooks Films Professor The films of Mel Brooks are discussed by Professor Jeremy Dauber, Atran Assistant Professor of Yiddish Language, Literature, and Culture at Columbia University. Taped before a live audience at New York's 92nd Street Y. Sunday - 8:30pm & 2am; Monday - 10pm; Wednesday - 10:30am; Friday - 8pm; Saturday - 1am & 4pm

In The News: Israel’s Political Turmoil
Ben-Dror Yemini, Israeli author & political commentator, discusses Israel’s political crisis, possible new elections, continuous demonstrations and the future of the current Coalition Government between Likud and Blue & White. With Shahar Azani. Sunday - 5:30pm & 11:30pm; Monday - 3:30am, 8:30am & 12:30pm

Kabbalat & Friday Evening Shabbat Services

Friday Night

Reform: Central Synagogue Erev Shabbat Services - 6pm & 11:15pm

Orthodox: Hampton Synagogue Kabbalat Shabbat - 7:15pm & 10:30pm

Shabbat Morning

Reform: Central Synagogue Shabbat Morning Services - 9:30am & 1pm

Orthodox: Hampton Synagogue Shabbat Morning Services- 11am & 2:30pm

Edith Samers Vice President 203.536.6914 (cell phone) JBS Jewish Broadcasting Service, a 501c3 fulltime television channel Website: jbstv.org

Thing You Need To Know About Ketubah Signing

In every Jewish wedding, the ketubah signing is a pivotal ritual. It primarily takes place before the wedding, but on the day of the wedding itself. In the signing ceremony, the officiants, bridal couple, the witnesses, and a few close family members and friends join in to witness the signing procedure.

What is Ketubah?

Shalom, who offers online homework writing service with TFTH, explains ketubah as a marriage contract of the Jewish wedding. The contract is validated before the marriage. The ketubah signing is about business. Usually, what goes in the ketubah is different at different weddings.

Primarily, the rule for all that is included in ketubah and who should sign the ketubah depends on whether the wedding is modern or Orthodox. Regardless of everything, the witnesses have to sign the document after reading it. After the ketubah is signed, it would be read out loud at the ceremony. Usually, it is later displayed in the new home of the couple. 

History and meaning of the concept

Marital contract or ketubah is an essential element of Jewish weddings for several thousand years. You can even find a mention of it in the bible. It puts forth how much a groom’s family needs to pay to the bride’s family upon the reunion of the couple. 

In a few Orthodox Jew communities, the text of the ketubah has not changed even in modern times, and it is still published in Aramaic. It is more or less similar to the prenuptial agreement. So, in the contract, you will also find the details of what the wife gets in the event of a divorce or an untimely death. It lays out all the promises made between the husband and a wife.

Samuel, an educator, who offers online statistics help with TAE, says that ketubah primarily lays out the marital obligations of the husband towards his wife. It also has an enlistment of how the husband will provide for the wife’s clothing, roof, food, and what he would do to please her on all the days of his life.

In modern Jew households, couples employ modern texts, which stipulate love and equality amongst the partners. It is common today for the bride and the groom to write the contract all by themselves. 

What will you find in a traditional ketubah?

In the traditional ketubah, you can find all the details of the wedding, including the name of the bride and the groom, the date of the wedding, and other related details. The contract also lays out all the things the couple owes to each other in the marriage. In the traditional contract, the ketubah will have mostly the obligation of the groom towards his wife.

In addition to it, it also lists out the conjugal and financial responsibilities of the groom. It will also take divorce into account. However, in the modern communities, ketubah is different and assures more equality.

However, it will have a detailed listing of what the bride and groom give each other. So, these are more or less similar to the marriage vows. 

How to write your ketubah?

The traditional text found in ketubah is outdated and ancient. Joshua, an educator and a tutor with EduWorldUSA, says that he and wife wrote their ketubah. Well today, almost all the young couples prefer writing their ketubah. Many even include their marital vows in this contract. A few also incorporate a romantic song or poetry into it.

Well, collectively speaking, different denominations have different rules associated with ketubah. So, it would be best if you checked with your officiant or rabbi about any specific requirements required at your ceremony. 

What to do if you neither want to write your ketubah nor wish to use the traditional text?

Well, if you want a new ketubah, but do not want to write your ketubah, you can easily find the several versions of the ketubah texts on the internet to pick from. The good thing is they are available in several different languages. You can even find ones for same-sex or inter-faith couples. Rayan, an associate with TrumpLearning, says that he took his version of ketubah from one of the websites that sell ketubah.

Who signs the ketubah?

If you attend an Orthodox Jew wedding, you will find that in their culture, it is not the bride and groom that signs the ketubah. According to the law, the two witnesses, who are unrelated to the couple, need to sign the ketubah. They should be males and abide by the Jew law.

However, in the modern Jew households, the two witnesses can be anyone who the couple appoints, regardless of their gender or faith. Some couples even like to have more than two witnesses. The bride and groom and the rabbi will also sign the document in modern Jew weddings.

Things You Need to Know About the Hora Dances

Sometimes known as the chair dance, the hora dance is performed at a Jewish wedding reception. It is a high energy dance and usually goes on for hours at a few weddings. To perform this dance, you would need a lot of stamina, but it is a fun dance and is regarded as a top highlight of Jewish weddings. 

What Is the Hora Dance?

Adam, an associate with TFTH,who is a Jew himself, explains hora as a traditional dance performed at the Jewish weddings where the new couple are lifted into the air, and their entire family and friends dance around them in circles. Throughout the routine, the couple holds one end of the napkin or the handkerchief. It is a signification of their union. 

Hora Dance history

Dancing in circles is not new. For centuries, it has been a vital part of the weddings in several cultures across the Balkans and South-eastern Europe. Though the feeling may be mutual, Romanians have their version of it, so do the Turkish, the Russians, and the Bulgarians. The hora dance that you see today dates back in 1924. Back then, it was performed for the Jews who were settling land in Palestine. Today, hora is associated with joy. It is, thus, performed at all special occasions, such as weddings both in America and Israel. 

Though the traditional hora was performed by individuals twirling around in circles, today these are done in a bigger group circle. Participants usually join in and move around in choreographed steps. The steps are very easy to memorize. Elijah, an educator who works with TAE,says that his grandmother used to tell him that back in the day men and women used to dance in separate circles in a wedding, but today things have changed. Yes, today in a Jew wedding, you will see both men and women dancing together. 

When should you do the hora dance?

As stated, the Hora dance is performed at the wedding reception. However, as such, there are no specific rules as to when the dance needs to be completed. In this, couples usually have two options. First, the dance can be done as the couple is introduced to the guests, that is at the beginning of the reception. If not, the dance can be performed after dinner. 

Who can take part in hora?

Well, anyone and everyone who can and wants to be a part of the hora dance can join in. Immanuel, an associate employee of TrumpLearning,says that at his wedding they had a large dance floor to accommodate all the guests in the Hora dance, and it was indeed good fun. 

Who all are lifted on the chairs during the dance?

Usually, it is the couple who is lifted on the chair. However, at some weddings, even the immediate family members of the couple, i.e., their parents or siblings are also lifted on the chair. 

Who lifts the chair for the couple? 

As such, there is no restriction, and anyone who would want to do the honours can lift the couple, provided they are strong enough to do that. Given that it would require some strength, people can take turns, and lift the bride and groom, as long as the dance goes on. In some cases, the lifters are appointed in advance, while the guests join in and dance in the circle. 

When should the hora planning start?

Typically, it is ideal to start the planning for the wedding reception at least two months before the wedding. Since hora is a part of the reception, it should also be included in the preparation two months before the date of the wedding. You need to contact a live band or a DJ who will be handling the music at the wedding. It is essential to discuss the duration of the dance too. 

Who will play Hava Nagila?

Usually, in modern weddings, it is the DJ or a live band who plays the music for the hora. However, ensure that whoever you pick for the hora has the adequate instructions about the performance and the duration of the dance. 

Who will initiate the hora dance?

Michel, says he instructed all his friends and colleagues at EduWorldUSAto initiate the dance. It is best to give responsibility of the dance to someone to ensure it goes smoothly. 

Who is inside the circle during the hora?

The hora dance usually has smaller circles inside one large circle. As the couple is supposed to be in the nucleus of the circle, it is customary to pull different groups in the dance with them. It is best to have one groomsman or bridesmaid in charge of encouraging all the guests of the wedding to swap in and out. It is a good practice and will ensure that everyone gets a turn. 

What is the fabric of the napkin?

There is often no rigidity on what the napkin should be made of. The only thing is that it should be sturdy to withstand the dance, and long enough so that the couple can hold on to each end of it with ease. Usually, people prefer to use a cloth napkin from the table setting for the purpose. However, couples can surely replace it with a piece of fabric, which holds a specific meaning to them. 

Things You Need to Know About the Hora Dance

Sometimes known as the chair dance, the hora dance is performed at a Jewish wedding reception. It is a high energy dance and usually goes on for hours at a few weddings. To perform this dance, you would need a lot of stamina, but it is a fun dance and is regarded as a top highlight of Jewish weddings. 

What Is the Hora Dance?

Adam, an associate with TFTH,who is a Jew himself, explains hora as a traditional dance performed at the Jewish weddings where the new couple are lifted into the air, and their entire family and friends dance around them in circles. Throughout the routine, the couple holds one end of the napkin or the handkerchief. It is a signification of their union. 

Hora Dance history

Dancing in circles is not new. For centuries, it has been a vital part of the weddings in several cultures across the Balkans and South-eastern Europe. Though the feeling may be mutual, Romanians have their version of it, so do the Turkish, the Russians, and the Bulgarians. The hora dance that you see today dates back in 1924. Back then, it was performed for the Jews who were settling land in Palestine. Today, hora is associated with joy. It is, thus, performed at all special occasions, such as weddings both in America and Israel. 

Though the traditional hora was performed by individuals twirling around in circles, today these are done in a bigger group circle. Participants usually join in and move around in choreographed steps. The steps are very easy to memorize. Elijah, an educator who works with TAE,says that his grandmother used to tell him that back in the day men and women used to dance in separate circles in a wedding, but today things have changed. Yes, today in a Jew wedding, you will see both men and women dancing together. 

When should you do the hora dance?

As stated, the Hora dance is performed at the wedding reception. However, as such, there are no specific rules as to when the dance needs to be completed. In this, couples usually have two options. First, the dance can be done as the couple is introduced to the guests, that is at the beginning of the reception. If not, the dance can be performed after dinner. 

Who can take part in hora?

Well, anyone and everyone who can and wants to be a part of the hora dance can join in. Immanuel, an associate employee of TrumpLearning,says that at his wedding they had a large dance floor to accommodate all the guests in the Hora dance, and it was indeed good fun. 

Who all are lifted on the chairs during the dance?

Usually, it is the couple who is lifted on the chair. However, at some weddings, even the immediate family members of the couple, i.e., their parents or siblings are also lifted on the chair. 

Who lifts the chair for the couple? 

As such, there is no restriction, and anyone who would want to do the honours can lift the couple, provided they are strong enough to do that. Given that it would require some strength, people can take turns, and lift the bride and groom, as long as the dance goes on. In some cases, the lifters are appointed in advance, while the guests join in and dance in the circle. 

When should the hora planning start?

Typically, it is ideal to start the planning for the wedding reception at least two months before the wedding. Since hora is a part of the reception, it should also be included in the preparation two months before the date of the wedding. You need to contact a live band or a DJ who will be handling the music at the wedding. It is essential to discuss the duration of the dance too. 

Who will play Hava Nagila?

Usually, in modern weddings, it is the DJ or a live band who plays the music for the hora. However, ensure that whoever you pick for the hora has the adequate instructions about the performance and the duration of the dance. 

Who will initiate the hora dance?

Michel, says he instructed all his friends and colleagues at EduWorldUSAto initiate the dance. It is best to give responsibility of the dance to someone to ensure it goes smoothly. 

Who is inside the circle during the hora?

The hora dance usually has smaller circles inside one large circle. As the couple is supposed to be in the nucleus of the circle, it is customary to pull different groups in the dance with them. It is best to have one groomsman or bridesmaid in charge of encouraging all the guests of the wedding to swap in and out. It is a good practice and will ensure that everyone gets a turn. 

What is the fabric of the napkin?

There is often no rigidity on what the napkin should be made of. The only thing is that it should be sturdy to withstand the dance, and long enough so that the couple can hold on to each end of it with ease. Usually, people prefer to use a cloth napkin from the table setting for the purpose. However, couples can surely replace it with a piece of fabric, which holds a specific meaning to them. 

ATJC High Holy Days Drive-In

High Holy Days as you never experienced before

The ATJC community is invited to join for a dynamic, meaningful, and inspiring High Holy Days experience. 3 incredible evening services with beautiful music, traditional prayers & inspiring messages LIVE on stage and on a huge 40-foot screen at Dezerland Park in NMB.

Erev Rosh Hashanah -- September 18th | 6:30 PM

2nd Night of Rosh Hashanah -- September 19th | 7:00 PM servicios en español

Ne'ilah - Yom Kippur Night -- September 28th | 6:00 PM

Cant make it? Don't worry services will be streamed live on Facebook | YouTube | ATJC Website
Not affiliated? Contact the synagogue office for further details, (305) 937-1880

Click Here for Tickets

Things You Need To Know About Ketubah Signing

In every Jewish wedding, the ketubah signing is a pivotal ritual. It primarily takes place before the wedding, but on the day of the wedding itself. In the signing ceremony, the officiants, bridal couple, the witnesses, and a few close family members and friends join in to witness the signing procedure.

What is Ketubah?

Shalom, who offers online homework writing service with TFTH, explains ketubah as a marriage contract of the Jewish wedding. The contract is validated before the marriage. The ketubah signing is about business. Usually, what goes in the ketubah is different at different weddings.

Primarily, the rule for all that is included in ketubah and who should sign the ketubah depends on whether the wedding is modern or Orthodox. Regardless of everything, the witnesses have to sign the document after reading it. After the ketubah is signed, it would be read out loud at the ceremony. Usually, it is later displayed in the new home of the couple. 

History and meaning of the concept

Marital contract or ketubah is an essential element of Jewish weddings for several thousand years. You can even find a mention of it in the bible. It puts forth how much a groom’s family needs to pay to the bride’s family upon the reunion of the couple. 

In a few Orthodox Jew communities, the text of the ketubah has not changed even in modern times, and it is still published in Aramaic. It is more or less similar to the prenuptial agreement. So, in the contract, you will also find the details of what the wife gets in the event of a divorce or an untimely death. It lays out all the promises made between the husband and a wife.

Samuel, an educator, who offers online statistics help with TAE, says that ketubah primarily lays out the marital obligations of the husband towards his wife. It also has an enlistment of how the husband will provide for the wife’s clothing, roof, food, and what he would do to please her on all the days of his life.

In modern Jew households, couples employ modern texts, which stipulate love and equality amongst the partners. It is common today for the bride and the groom to write the contract all by themselves. 

What will you find in a traditional ketubah?

In the traditional ketubah, you can find all the details of the wedding, including the name of the bride and the groom, the date of the wedding, and other related details. The contract also lays out all the things the couple owes to each other in the marriage. In the traditional contract, the ketubah will have mostly the obligation of the groom towards his wife.

In addition to it, it also lists out the conjugal and financial responsibilities of the groom. It will also take divorce into account. However, in the modern communities, ketubah is different and assures more equality.

However, it will have a detailed listing of what the bride and groom give each other. So, these are more or less similar to the marriage vows. 

How to write your ketubah?

The traditional text found in ketubah is outdated and ancient. Joshua, an educator and a tutor with EduWorldUSA, says that he and wife wrote their ketubah. Well today, almost all the young couples prefer writing their ketubah. Many even include their marital vows in this contract. A few also incorporate a romantic song or poetry into it.

Well, collectively speaking, different denominations have different rules associated with ketubah. So, it would be best if you checked with your officiant or rabbi about any specific requirements required at your ceremony. 

What to do if you neither want to write your ketubah nor wish to use the traditional text?

Well, if you want a new ketubah, but do not want to write your ketubah, you can easily find the several versions of the ketubah texts on the internet to pick from. The good thing is they are available in several different languages. You can even find ones for same-sex or inter-faith couples. Rayan, an associate with TrumpLearning, says that he took his version of ketubah from one of the websites that sell ketubah.

Who signs the ketubah?

If you attend an Orthodox Jew wedding, you will find that in their culture, it is not the bride and groom that signs the ketubah. According to the law, the two witnesses, who are unrelated to the couple, need to sign the ketubah. They should be males and abide by the Jew law.

However, in the modern Jew households, the two witnesses can be anyone who the couple appoints, regardless of their gender or faith. Some couples even like to have more than two witnesses. The bride and groom and the rabbi will also sign the document in modern Jew weddings

JBS Highlights starting 8/23: Robert Siegel premiers new JBS series, “Rabbis Week” on L’Chayim, AJC Global: The U.S. and Europe and New Books in Jewish Law

Watch JBS on Atlantic Broadband Ch168, Hotwire Ch269, Fios Ch798, DirecTV Ch388, Blue Stream Ch 110, streamed on Roku under "educational", Apple TV, Fire TV and jbstv.org. For a complete and timely schedule and other television providers, go to www.jbstv.org

One of America’s foremost broadcast journalists, Robert Siegel, who hosted NPR’s iconic “All Things Considered” for more than 30 years, will be premiering his new monthly series on JBS this week. Entitled “Global Connections: Navigating The New Abnormal,” Robert will engage in panel conversations with leading figures in the fields of medicine, finance, education, technology and a range of other topics that are most relevant to all of us during these tumultuous times. A presentation of the American Friends of the Rabin Medical Center in Israel, we are proud to be in partnership with AFRMC and with its Executive Director Rabbi Joshua Plaut, producer of the series.

AJC Global: The U.S. and Europe

The changing nature of the relationship between the U.S. and Europe since the end of WWII is discussed by Amb. Wolfgang Ischinger (Munich Security Conference Chairman) and Simone Rodan-Benzaquen (AJC Europe Dir) in an AJC Global Forum 2020 conversation. Monday - 8pm & 1:30am; Wednesday - 2pm; Saturday - 7pm & 4am

New Books in Jewish Law

Three new, important books in the field of Jewish law are introduced by scholars, and the authors respond. A join event from the Jewish Review of Books and the Jewish Law Association, under the auspices of the Gruss Program of NYU Law School. Tuesday - 7:30pm & 1am; Thursday - 2pm; Saturday - 8pm & 4am

Robert Siegel: New Abnormal

Legendary radio host of All Things Considered for over 30 years Robert Siegel hosts "Global Connections: Navigating The New Abnormal," a new virtual leaders forum. Each month, Siegel will interview different experts on vital issues facing the economy, medicine, science and technology, to discuss new realities in our society, and explore how to navigate the complexities of this turbulent time. The first in a new series from AFRMC (The American Friends of Rabin Medical Center). This week, Robert Siegel will be speaking with EJ Dionne, Scott Rechler, Yuval Rooz and Dr. Michael Drescher about changes in economics and social attitudes. Wednesday - 8pm & 1am; Saturday - 8pm

Talmud: Free Speech

Mordechai Becher uses Torah verses, Talmudic texts and rabbinic commentary to explain the Jewish Tradition's understanding of free speech. Sunday - 9am; Monday - 4am; Tuesday - 9am & 4:30pm; Thursday - 7pm & 2am

Jewish 101: Threefold Blessing

Learn about Shabbat and how the rabbis interpretation of the Creation Story's threefold blessing given to human beings in Genesis Chapter 1 suggests a role most people don't normally imagine. "Jewish 101" is hosted by Rabbi Mark S. Golub. Wednesday - 9am & 4:30pm; Friday - 1pm

From Date to Mate: Episode 7

In this season finale, Brett, Justin and Paige find themselves in a love triangle while the issue of "trust" looms large for Daniel and Zoe. Today (Sunday) - 1:30am; Monday - 7:30pm & 1:30am; Wednesday - 1:30pm; Thursday - 10am & 5:30pm

On L'Chayim This Week

Dr. Mordechai Kedar Pt. 1

Mordechai Kedar, a leading scholar on Arab culture (Bar-Ilan University), addresses the profound misconceptions Americans have about the structure and mentality of the Palestinian world and offers an alternative peace plan. Sunday - 12 Noon

**Dr. Mordechai Kedar Pt. 2

Mordechai Kedar, a leading scholar on Arab culture (Bar Ilan University), explains why the Arab world needs to recognize Israel as a Jewish State and why the issue of Palestinian refugees reflects an anti-Israel bias. Sunday – 6pm

Avi Weiss

Avi Weiss, one of American Jewry’s most creative and activist rabbis (Hebrew Institute of Riverdale, Yeshivat Chovevei Torah), discusses his approach to orthodoxy with Mark S. Golub on L'Chayim. Monday - 9pm & 2am; Tuesday - 3pm

Shai Held

Shai Held, founding President, Dean and Chair in Jewish Thought of Hadar Institute, discusses growing up with Survivor Zionist parents and how his upbringing shaped his life and Jewish journey.
Tuesday - 9pm & Midnight; Wednesday - 3pm

Jonathan Sacks

The former Chief Orthodox Rabbi of the UK, Rabbi Lord Jonathan Sacks, describes how meeting the Lubavitcher Rebbe and Rav Joseph Soloveitchik changed his life; his years as Chief Rabbi; and his evolution on Jewish pluralism.
Wednesday - 9pm & Midnight; Thursday - 3pm

Rabbi David Eliezrie

Rabbi David Eliezrie, National Chabad Liaison to JFNA and author of The Secret of Chabad, describes what drew him to Chabad and his career as an emissary, and shares his perspective on Chabad philosophy regarding non-Orthodox Jews.
Thursday - 9pm & Midnight; Friday - 3pm
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Ken Spiro

Aish HaTorah lecturer and author Ken Spiro (“World Perfect” and “Destiny”) discusses antisemitism as anti-Zionism, American Jewry and today’s Democratic party, and the core values of Jewish idealism. Saturday - 6pm

92nd Street Y: Obama's Rabbi-Rabbi Capers Funnye

Meet Michelle Obama's first cousin (once removed), Rabbi Capers Funnye, who discusses his conversion to Judaism, his work in Africa, and what the black Jewish experience is like in America. Sunday - 8pm & 2am; Monday - 10:30pm; Tuesday - 4am; Wednesday - 10:30am; Saturday - 1am & 4pm

In The News: Peace Agreement Between Arab World and Israel

Senior VP of JBS Shahar Azani fills in for Mark S. Golub to speak with Rabbi Marc Schneier, President of FFEU, to discuss the dramatic UAE deal with Israel, brokered by the Trump administration. Sunday - 5:30pm & 11:30pm; Monday - 3:30am, 8:30am & 12:30pm

Kabbalat & Friday Evening Shabbat Services

Friday Night

Reform: Central Synagogue Erev Shabbat Services - 6pm & 11:15pm

Orthodox: Hampton Synagogue Kabbalat Shabbat - 7:15pm & 10:30pm

Shabbat Morning

Reform: Central Synagogue Shabbat Morning Services - 9:30am & 1pm

Orthodox: Hampton Synagogue Shabbat Morning Services- 11am & 2:30pm

Posted by Edith Samers Vice President 203.536.6914 (cell phone) JBS Jewish Broadcasting Service, a 501c3 fulltime television channel Website: jbstv.org

Shofar and Tashlich with Bet Shira

Join Bet Shira Congregation live at the canal (SW 120th St and 69 Pl) for Shofar Blowing followed by Tashlich. Sunday September 20 6:30 pm.

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